Federal Civil Remedy for Misappropriation of Trade Secrets Now Available

by M. Tom Langan, II

President Obama recently signed into law legislation that creates a federal civil remedy for the misappropriation of trade secrets. Trade secrets are a form of intellectual property that consist of a business’s methods, designs, formulas, and other confidential or proprietary information that helps a business obtain economic advantages over its competitors. While there were federal remedies for misappropriation of other forms of intellectual property (i.e. trademarks, patents, copyrights etc.), trade secrets were not protected at the federal level until now. The Defend Trade Secrets Act of 2015 offers a variety of remedies, from monetary penalties to injunctive relief to even seizure orders – all designed to stop the unlawful dissemination of trade secrets. There is a 3 year statute of limitations to bring a claim based off when the misappropriation is discovered or should have been discovered based off a reasonable investigation.

© 2016 Vandenack Williams LLC
For more information, Contact Us

Understanding and Preventing Unintentional Copyright Infringement on Websites

Federal copyright law protects a copyright owner from a wide range of intentional and unintentional infringement. For example, an entity that runs a blog or a website could be liable for copyright infringement if a third party posts copyrighted material onto the webpage. In fact, the federal copyright law is broad and states: “[a]nyone who violates any of the exclusive rights of the copyright owner . . .  is an infringer of the copyright or right of the author, as the case may be.” 17 U.S.C. § 501. In conjunction with the strict liability standard used in copyright infringement cases, violating federal copyright law becomes frequent and difficult to prevent in the digital age.

In light of modern technology, new copyright challenges have emerged, such as one found in Perfect 10, Inc. v. Amazon.com, Inc., 508 F.3d 1146 (9th Cir. 2007), which involved two large technology companies, Google and Amazon. The issue, in essence, was Google and Amazon infringing upon copyrighted photographs because Google’s automated website indexing propagated the photographs in image searches, and subsequently on Amazon for other related services. Although this complex litigation involved a multitude of factors within copyright law, the issue in the case highlights the propensity for unintended copyright infringement with technology.

Fortunately, Congress recognized this issue in 1998 and passed the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, creating safe harbors for unintentional copyright infringement in specific situations. Although the safe harbors are somewhat limited, the law is intended to “balance the interests of copyright owners and online service providers by promoting cooperation, minimizing copyright infringement, and providing a higher degree of certainty to service providers on the question of copyright infringement.” Capitol Records, Inc. v. MP3tunes, LLC, 821 F.Supp.2d 627 (S.D.N.Y. 2011). Ultimately, this means every entity that has a website, blog, or online community of some sort, should take measures to ensure that their online presence fits within a safe harbor or does not violate copyright law.

© 2015 Houghton Vandenack Williams
For more information, Contact Us

Domain Blocks Now Available for “.sucks” Domain Extensions

By Tom Langan. Earlier this year, over 550 new domain name extensions were created.  Examples include .basketball, .college, .miami, and .fishing.  Among the more controversial additions is “.sucks” which allows nearly anyone to obtain the domain www.[InsertYourName].sucks.  A “domain block” feature is now available that would allow individuals and/or business owners to reserve .sucks domain extensions and prevent others from using it. A domain block costs $199 and is valid for one (1) year.

© 2015 Houghton Vandenack Williams
For more information, Contact Us

What Law Governs Contracts With Foreign Entities?

A Business FAQ with Mark A. Williams.

The law that governs every contract is usually the law that the contract says. In  most agreements, there will be a provision in it that says if we get into a dispute, here is the law that is going to apply. If the contract does not say that, then there is a little bit of a problem. Every state has some laws and there are federal treaties with other countries, and those laws and treaties are supposed to work out whether it is the law of your state or whether it is the law of the foreign jurisdiction that is going to apply.

The important thing to think about is if you are going to do business with a company in another country, you really need to  make sure that in your contract, you specify what law is going to apply and what jurisdiction lawsuits are going to happen in so that if there is a dispute, you know how it can get resolved.

© 2014 Parsonage Vandenack Williams LLC

For more information, Contact Us

Can My Competitors Use My Business Name in Their Keyword Advertising?

An Intellectual Property FAQ with Mark A. Williams.

I would like to tell you that the answer to this question is no, they can never use your name but that is just not the truth. Some of the questions here come down to what have you done to protect your name? If you have obtained a federal trademark in your name, it makes it a lot easier for you to stop other people from using it. Where do you use your name? If you have a federal trademark, the law says you are using it in all 50 states. If you don’t have a federal trademark and you are only doing business in one state, you might have a competitor in an adjoining state that could legally use your name in their advertising.

It is really important to make sure that you have the right legal protections for your business name and all of your intellectual property when running your business.

© 2014 Parsonage Vandenack Williams LLC

For more information, Contact Us

What Is Trademark Infringement?

An Intellectual Property FAQ with Mark A. Williams.

Put simply, trademark infringement is when you use somebody else’s trademark; however, it is really a lot more complex than that. If you use any mark or symbol to identify your goods and that confuses customers as to whether or not you might be associated with someone else’s goods. There are a lot of examples of this in industry, but basically, you cannot take a word and change how it is spelled or use a phonetically similar word to trade on the value of the other mark for your benefit. If you do that, you are infringing that other person’s rights and they have the right to not only stop you, but to potentially take the profits of your business that you gained from using that mark, for their own benefit.

© 2014 Parsonage Vandenack Williams LLC

For more information, Contact Us

Is Federal Trademark Registration Valid Outside the United States?

An Intellectual Property FAQ with Mark A. Williams.

If you obtain a federal trademark within the United States with the United States Patent and Trademark Office, it will apply to anybody that wants to do business within the United States. So a foreign company that wants to come to your state or to the U.S. and do business, yes, it applies to them.

What it doesn’t do is it doesn’t stop people in another country from using your trademark. If you do business outside of the United States or if you do business on the internet with people in foreign countries, you really have to consider whether you need to obtain a trademark in those countries, or whether you have to seek what is called Madrid Protocol protection, which is something akin to a treaty between several different countries that will extend your U.S. trademark protection to those countries.

© 2014 Parsonage Vandenack Williams LLC

For more information, Contact Us