IRS Notice Provides Penalty Relief to Certain Partnership Return Filing Taxpayers

by Monte L. Schatz

The IRS has issued Notice 2017-47 that provides penalty relief to partnerships that filed certain untimely returns or untimely requests for extension of time who filed those returns for the first taxable year that began after December 31, 2015.

Section 2006 of the Surface Transportation and Veterans Health Care Choice Improvement Act of 2015 (the Surface Transportation Act), Public Law 114–41, 129 Stat. 443 (2015), amended section 6072 of the Internal Revenue Code (the Code) and changed the date by which a partnership must file its annual return. The due date for filing the annual return of a partnership changed from the fifteenth day of the fourth month following the close of the taxable year (April 15 for calendar-year -2- taxpayers) to the fifteenth day of the third month following the close of the taxable year (March 15 for calendar-year taxpayers). The new due date applies to the returns of partnerships for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2015.

Many partnerships failed to timely file their various partnership returns (1065, 1065-B, 8804, 8805 or 7004 Extension requests for any of the other various partnership returns).  The assumption of these taxpayers was that the normal deadlines for their 2016 Partnership returns applied (namely April 18, 2017 for the actual returns and September 15, 2017 for those that filed the Form 7004 extension for any of these returns).    Normally in these circumstances the taxpayer is subject to late filing penalties; however, the new filing deadlines shortening the return filing period by one month resulted in many taxpayers filing late returns and the IRS has provided relief for those late filed returns.

The IRS in Notice 2017-47 has announced relief will be granted automatically for penalties for failure to timely file Forms 1065, 1065-B, 8804, 8805, and any other returns, such as Form 5471, for which the due date is tied to the due date of Form 1065 or Form 1065-B. Partnerships that qualify for relief and have already been assessed penalties can expect to receive a letter within the next several months notifying them that the penalties have been abated.  For reconsideration of a penalty covered by this notice that has not been abated by February 28, 2018, contact the number listed in the letter that notified you of the penalty or call (800) 829-1040 and state that you are entitled to relief under Notice 2017-47.

SOURCE: IRS Guidewire Issue Number N-2017-47

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Legacy ERISA Regulation Triggers Fiduciary Acknowledgement and Disclosures from Plan Advisers

By Monte Schatz

The Department of Labor’s fiduciary rule became effective June 9, 2017.  A whole new set of client disclosures will be required for advisers who previously were not operating under the fiduciary standard.  Interestingly, many of these disclosure requirements are not mandated by the fiduciary rule itself, but under a regulation that was part of the Employment Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 commonly referred to as ERISA.

29 C.F.R. § 408(b)(2) requires certain pension plan service providers to disclose information about the service providers’ compensation and potential conflict of interests.   Ironically, this regulation was introduced originally as an interim rule in 2010.  It was published as a final rule on February 3, 2012.  The intent and purpose of the regulation was to assist plan fiduciaries in assessing the reasonableness of compensation paid for services.  Also, the disclosure requirements are designed to assist plan fiduciaries to act prudently and solely in the interest of the plan’s participants by defraying reasonable expenses of administering the plan and avoiding conflicts of interest.

From 2012 to the present day, brokers and other non-fiduciary providers to ERISA retirement plans largely didn’t disclose they were fiduciaries.   However, with the institution of the fiduciary rule the status of those types of advisers have been elevated to the fiduciary standard which triggers the new disclosure requirements.  This subjects those groups to covered provider status.  The three major categories of covered service providers include:

(1) fiduciary investment managers and advisors,

(2) record keeping platforms and broker/dealers, and

(3) providers of other types of services that also receive revenue sharing payments                   or other “indirect” compensation other than from the plan or plan sponsor

The groups that fall under the provisions of 408(b)(2) must provide updated disclosures to plan fiduciaries within 60 days from the date of which the covered service provider is informed of such a change in status.   The 60 day standard is vague as it doesn’t define whether it is June 9th, 2017 or if the 60 days begins to run from the first day an adviser makes an investment recommendation post-June 9th.   The general consensus is to take the conservative approach and commence providing updated disclosure immediately and assume the 60 day clock runs from June 9th, 2017.

For advisers who previously have operated under the fiduciary standard the 408(b)(2) requirements will be “business as usual”.  For those advisers that are new to the fiduciary standard it is imperative that they provide the required disclosures in a concise and understandable one page format.   Previous plan adviser agreements that placed disclosures in multiple documents will no longer satisfy the disclosure requirements that are a critical part of the fiduciary rule.

© 2017 Vandenack Weaver LLC
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SOURCES:

http://www.investmentnews.com/article/20170608/FREE/170609941/the-disclosure-401-k-advisers-may-be-missing-under-the-dol-fiduciary?utm_source=Morning-20170609&utm_campaign=investmentnews&utm_medium=email&utm_visit=655100

http://www.investmentnews.com/article/20120202/FREE/120209978/labor-department-unveils-kinder-gentler-fee-disclosure-regs

http://webapps.dol.gov/federalregister/PdfDisplay.aspx?DocId=25781

Federal Judge Orders IRS to Refund Tax Preparers for PTIN Fees

In 2014, tax return preparers brought a federal class action lawsuit challenging the legality of fees charged by the IRS for PTINs (Preparer Tax Identification Number). Regulations promulgated in 2010 and 2011 imposed requirements on tax return preparers including obtaining a specific PTIN and paying a fee associated with obtaining such PTIN. Currently, the application and renewal fee for a PTIN is $50.00.

The preparers in the class action argued that the fees are unlawful since tax preparers receive no special benefits from the PTIN and secondly the fee is unreasonable in comparison to the costs the IRS incurs to issue the PTIN.

On June 1, 2017, Judge Royce C. Lamberth of the United States District Court for the District of Columbia held that the IRS may continue to require PTINs but granted summary judgment in favor of the tax preparers stating, in part, that the IRS may not charge fees for issuing PTINs. Following a review of applicable case law, the Court found that PTINs are not a “service or thing of value” provided by the IRS. The IRS will be enjoined from charging fees in the future and is required to refund fees charged for the PTINs to all members of the class.

The order granting summary judgment is not yet a final judgment. Such final judgment will indicate the amount owed to each member of the class and may be subject to appeal by the IRS.

For more information, including court documents and the opinion rendered by Judge Lamberth see http://ptinclassaction.com/

© 2017 Vandenack Weaver LLC
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IRS Issues Tax and Reporting Relief for Proposed Fiduciary Standard Consistent with Department of Labor Regulations

By Monte Schatz

There have been a significant series of regulatory announcements and rulings related to the fiduciary duty and its application to employee benefit plans.  The final fiduciary duty rule became effective on June 7, 2016, and has an applicability date of April 10, 2017. The President by Memorandum to the Secretary of Labor directed the Labor Department to examine the impact of the fiduciary duty rule.  On March 2nd the DOL published 82 FR 12319 seeking public comments about questions raised in the Presidential Memorandum.  The March 2nd notice also provided that a 60-day delay in implementation would be effective on the date of publication of a final rule

The Principal Transactions Exemptions and the accompanying Best Interest Contract provisions, included as part of the fiduciary duty rule, also have an applicability date of April 10, 2017, with a phased implementation period ending on January 1, 2018. The BIC Exemption effectively states that the fiduciary advisor must sign a “Best Interests Contract” (BIC) with the client, stipulating that the advisor will provide advice that is in the Best Interests of the client.   The Principal Transactions Exemption allows compensation for certain transactions by certain broker-dealers, insurance agents, and others that will act as investment advice fiduciaries that would otherwise violate prohibited transaction rules that trigger excise taxes and civil liability.

Most investment industry groups’ concerns regarding any non-compliance during a “gap period” of the financial fiduciary rule focused on Department of Labor and its potential civil liability enforcement provisions as outlined under ERISA.  Additional concerns were raised concerning Internal Revenue Service enforcement provisions found in Internal Revenue Code §4975 prohibited transaction rules that provides for the imposition of excise taxes for violations of that rule.

As a result of delays of the Fiduciary Standard rules, the Department of Labor published Field Assistance Bulletin (FAB) 2017-01.  FAB 2017-01 provides that, to the extent circumstances surrounding its decision on the proposed delay of the April 10 applicability date give rise to the need for other temporary relief, including retroactive prohibited transaction relief, the DOL will consider taking such additional steps as necessary with respect to the arrangements and transactions covered by the DOL temporary enforcement policy and any subsequent related DOL enforcement guidance.

In Announcement 2017–4 the IRS stated, Because the Code and ERISA contemplate consistency in the enforcement of the prohibited transaction rules by the IRS and the DOL, the Treasury Department and the IRS have determined that it is appropriate to adopt a temporary excise tax non-applicability policy that conforms with the DOL’s temporary enforcement policy described in FAB 2017-01. Accordingly, the IRS will not apply § 4975 and related reporting obligations with respect to any transaction or agreement to which the DOL’s temporary enforcement policy, or other subsequent related enforcement guidance, would apply.

SOURCES:

http://www.asppa.org/News/Article/ArticleID/8480

https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-drop/a-17-04.pdf

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Nebraska Bill Recognizing Fantasy Sports Fails to Pass

by M. Tom Langan, II

A bill seeking to recognize fantasy sports as a game of knowledge and skill (and not illegal gambling) failed to pass through the Nebraska Legislature.  In addition to permitting fantasy contests for cash prizes, LB862 would have required fantasy contest operators to register with the Department of Revenue and implement certain safeguard features, such as preventing employees from participating and/or sharing confidential “insider” information.  The bill was met with heavy opposition and was indefinitely postponed on April 20, 2016 leaving the legal status of fantasy contests for cash prizes uncertain in Nebraska.

© 2016 Vandenack Williams LLC
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The Supreme Court PPACA Ruling and Your Taxes

On June 25, 2015, the United States Supreme Court made headlines by ruling on King v. Burwell, No. 14-114, pertaining to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (the “Act”). At issue, whether the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) may promulgate regulations that extend subsidies to individuals purchasing health insurance from a federal healthcare exchange instead of a state-based exchange. The question arose because the language of the Act itself suggested the insurance must be purchased through a state exchange in order for the individual to receive a subsidy. The Supreme Court found in favor of the IRS, allowing tax subsidies in the dozens of states that did not establish a state exchange and instead rely solely on the federal exchange.

What does this mean for the individual consumer, from a tax perspective? This means that regardless of the state in which you live, or whether the insurance was purchased on a state or federal exchange, subsidies for health insurance are available. Generally, an individual may receive assistance in obtaining health insurance by qualifying for a premium tax credit, cost sharing reduction subsidy, or Medicaid and CHIP. The premium tax credit,  the focal point of the King v. Burwell case, provides a subsidy based upon the applicant’s income.

Internal Revenue Code § 36B provides a potential premium tax credit for health insurance purchasers, dependent upon the modified adjusted gross income (MAGI) of the taxpayer and individuals in the taxpayer’s household required to file a tax return. If the income is between 100% and 400% of the federal poverty line, currently $11,770 for a one person household, a tax credit may be available. Depending upon the MAGI, the IRS limits the amount a taxpayer is required to pay for a health insurance premium, with a maximum payment range of 2% to 9.5% of the total MAGI. Any premium in excess of the applicable maximum percentage of income will be covered by the premium tax credit. The tax credit is payable in advance, to the insurer, to reduce the premium directly paid by the taxpayer. However, should the advance payments be made, the individual taxpayer must submit IRS Form 8962 with the individual’s annual tax return in order to reconcile the advance tax credit payments provided with the amount of the eligible tax credit based on the income shown on the return. In the event the reconciliation results in the taxpayer receiving a higher or lower tax credit than the amount for which the individual is eligible, an additional credit may be available, or a portion of the advanced credit the taxpayer received may need to be repaid.

King v. Burwell, No. 14-114, allows those purchasing health insurance on the federal healthcare exchange who are receiving subsidies to continue to do so. Although the tax credits are still available, an individual receiving the premium tax credit should be careful to recognize the potential tax implications on their next annual income tax return.

© 2015 Houghton Vandenack Williams

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Federal Contractors Take Note – The Minimum Wage Will Rise to $10.10 in 2015

By Eric W. Tiritilli.

The Department of Labor recently issued a final rule raising the minimum wage for employees working on new covered federal contracts to $10.10 beginning on January 1, 2015.  A “new” contract is one that results from a solicitation issued on or after January 1, 2015, or that is awarded outside of the solicitation process after January 1, 2015.  On January 1, 2016, and annually after that, the minimum wage will be increased in an amount determined by the Secretary of Labor.

Violation of the new Department of Labor rules on minimum wage for covered federal contractors can lead to serious penalties including the withholding of payments due to the contractor to pay wages due to employees and, potentially, debarment.  The Department of Labor notes that the new minimum wage requirements will affect approximately 200,000 workers in the United States.

© 2014 Parsonage Vandenack Williams LLC

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