Tax Related Identity Theft Awareness

The holiday season is underway and while this is a time for family events and holiday parties, this is also the time that many identity theft scams occur. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) started the process of alerting taxpayers about potential tax-related identity theft and to provide advice on how to prevent threats to your identity.

For prevention, the initial steps include ensuring use of security software on devices, use of secure wireless networks, and never providing sensitive data when replying to emails, texts, or pop-up ads. For individuals that are hit with tax-related identity theft, it may not become apparent until attempting to file taxes or receiving a notice from the IRS and finding out that a tax return has been filed on your behalf. When this occurs, file a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) at https://www.identitytheft.gov/, file a report with the credit agencies, and contact the IRS. Importantly, regardless of the situation, ensure that your taxes are filed and paid, even if it requires filing in paper form.

Taking steps now to add layers of security for your social security number and other sensitive data can help prevent tax-identity theft in the future. If you have questions, please contact the attorneys at Vandenack Weaver LLC.

© 2016 Vandenack Weaver LLC
For more information, Contact Us

 

 

Advertisements

Initial Steps for Victims of Tax Related Identity Theft

As the 2016 tax season comes to a close, many taxpayers may have discovered they were victims of identity theft. Taxpayers often discover that they have been a victim of identity theft after they receive information that a tax return has already been filed using their social security number. If you are e-filing and a return has already been filed, your filing will likely be rejected. If the IRS suspects identity theft, you will receive Letter 5071C, which will request you verify your identity. Such verification can be completed online at https://idverify.irs.gov/IE/e-authenticate/welcome.do.

 After discovering that you have been a victim of identity theft, you should take multiple actions to protect your identity and correct any fraudulent returns with the IRS. It is recommended that you contact the FTC at identitytheft.gov and contact one of the major credit bureaus to place a fraud alert on your credit. If you have received a notice from the IRS or your attempt to e-file a return was denied, you should immediately contact the IRS. If your e-filing has been denied and you believe it is related to identity theft, you must complete Form 14039, Identity Theft Affidavit. Form 14039, a paper copy of your return, and any required payment of tax should be mailed to the IRS.

 If issues persist related to any fraudulently filed tax returns, additional information can be obtained from the IRS’s website, https://www.irs.gov/, or by contacting Vandenack Williams LLC.

© 2016 Vandenack Williams LLC
For more information, Contact Us