IRS Adopts Simplified Form for Small Nonprofits

By James Pieper

The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has adopted a new, shorter online form for small charitable organizations seeking nonprofit status.

The Form 1023-EZ reduces the existing 26-page form to three pages for qualifying groups.  Organizations with gross receipts of $50,000 or less and assets of $250,000 or less will be able to use the streamlined process.

In a media release, IRS Commissioner John Koskinen stated: “This is a common-sense approach that will help reduce lengthy processing delays for small tax-exempt groups and ultimately larger organizations as well. The change cuts paperwork for these charitable groups and speeds application processing so they can focus on their important work.”

The new form can only be completed online and will help the IRS clear its backlog of more than 60,000 pending nonprofit applications.

© 2017 Vandenack Weaver LLC
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A Business Entity on the Rise: The Public Benefit Corporation

Until recently, many entrepreneurs were struggling to use their businesses to create a positive social change, mainly because traditional corporate laws require a corporation’s purpose to focus on maximizing shareholder value. However, the public benefit corporation is a newer business structure that is legally required to consider how its decisions will affect the general public, in addition to how its decisions will maximize shareholder profits. Thus, public benefit corporations can serve the best interests of society while creating value for stockholders.

Approximately thirty-two states recognize benefit corporations. In 2013, Delaware adopted legislation that recognizes the public benefit corporation as an entity and it is currently one of the most popular states for incorporation. Delaware corporation laws require a public benefit corporation to have the corporate purpose of operating in a responsible and sustainable manner. Further, the benefit corporation must identify one or more public benefit purposes. Last, Delaware benefit corporations must report biennially to shareholders about the corporation’s overall impact on the shareholders’ financial interests and on the interest of those identified in the public benefit corporate purpose.

In 2014, Nebraska joined the ranks of the other states that recognize benefit corporations as a legal entity. Nebraska benefit corporations have the purpose of creating general public benefits and may also have specific public benefit purposes, such as the purpose of promoting the arts and sciences. Additionally, the benefit corporation must prepare an annual report for the corporation’s shareholders that identifies the ways in which the benefit corporation pursued a general public benefit during the year and any circumstances that hindered the creation of a general or specific public benefit.

Ultimately, lawmakers hope public benefit corporations will create jobs, improve communities, and use innovative approaches to solve society’s most challenging problems.

© 2017 Vandenack Weaver LLC
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Selecting the Right Entity for Your Tech Startup

Nebraska, and neighboring Midwest states, have developed a reputation as the “Silicon Prairie,” a prime location for technology startups. The recent tech startup boom in the Midwest can be attributed to the lower cost of living, knowledgeable tech labor force, and willingness of the community to embrace the startup. For many of these startups, besides the intense need to develop and protect the technology, a common issue is picking the right business entity structure.

 

In picking the right entity for the startup, several considerations should be weighed, including the need for liability protection, how the company will fund operations, and the most beneficial tax status. For example, if a tech startup is developing a product that will take a substantial period to produce, and likely need multiple rounds of equity financing involving institutional investors, with other funding coming through debt, the demand for classes of shares, preferences, and conversion rights, may require that the startup to form as a C-corporation, with corresponding tax status. On the other hand, if the startup only intends to have one round of equity financing, through a “friends and family” offering, a limited liability company may be appropriate, providing additional flexibility to select tax status.

 

Picking the right type of entity is important for the success of a tech startup, with many considerations to weigh. Ultimately, as facts change, it may be possible to change the structure of your company, but initial selection should not be taken lightly and can reduce problems as your company grows.

© 2017 Vandenack Weaver LLC
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When Should I Use an LLC vs. a Corporation?

A Video FAQ with Mark A. Williams.

A corporation cannot be used if you want to be taxed like a partnership. An LLC, or limited liability company, can elect any kind of tax treatment. So if you want the ultimate flexibility in how you are going to be taxed, the limited liability company is definitely the way to go. Also, a limited liability company gives you greater flexibility in determining the rights of the various types of owners.

Now a corporation, on the other hand, has been around for a very long time so there is a good established set of law and rules that apply to corporations. So for some people, the comfort of knowing exactly what they are getting into outweighs the flexibility that the limited liability company might provide.

© 2014 Parsonage Vandenack Williams LLC

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What Is an LLC and Why Should I Form One?

An LLC is a limited liability company and forming a limited liability company is basically to run a business out of or to own real estate or some other type of property. So if you are going into business or you are buying property as an investment, an LLC is one type of entity that you could look at forming, along with a corporation or a partnership. The pros and cons of those different business entity types are numerous, so you really have to get good counsel to make those decisions.

© 2014 Parsonage Vandenack Williams LLC

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